Lorenzo Snow, Jul 5, 1900

-- Jul 5, 1900
President [Lorenzo] Snow was feeling much better today, he took a ride yesterday and again today, but is still confined to his room most of the time. At 11 o'clock the brethren met in the Temple. There were present of the First Presidency, Presidents George Q. Cannon and Joseph F. Smith, of the Apostles, Brigham Young [Jr.], Francis M. Lyman, John W. Taylor, Anthon H. Lund, Matthias F. Cowley, Rudger Clawson and Reed Smoot. ... A long communication was read from President Ben E. Rich of the Southern States mission, in answer to a communication of the First Presidency to him of the 22 ult. The writer rendered a financial account of the mission and explained to the satisfactory of the Council the questions asked him by the Presidency. Some time was spent in discussing the advisability of continuing the policy of the Southern States mission furnishing its elders suits of clothes, and making it a requirement that they purchase them, and thus having its elders dressed uniformly. Brother Young felt that the business policy of the Southern States mission was founded on a false basis, for the reason that it was nothing more or less than a credit system, and must eventually bankrupt itself. He said he could not suggest a remedy for it except to cut the credit system down and do business on a cash basis. He did not favor uniformity in dress of our missionaries; and he feared that the commissary department produced this effect, that missionaries would learn to trust in it instead of the Lord. Brother Cowley made quite a lengthy talk giving his experience in the Southern States. He was inclined to the belief that if the commissary department were dispensed with it would cost the elders less for their support than at present. President Cannon felt that something ought to be done in all of our missions to, if possible, lessen the expense of keeping missionaries, as the strain had become so great on their friends at home that many were already feeling the burden that was upon them. Brother John W. Taylor remarked that he had by way of experiment, instructed the elders in the Colorado mission to work about a month during the busy season of each year and thereby earn something to pay their own expenses; and he had instructed them not to send home for means for their support. This was of doing had made for themselves friends, and got them school houses to preach in. He felt that if the elders would work during the day and preach at night they would do better. Brother Young added, "And escape persecution." Brother Lyman now remarked that as persecution generally was aroused during the summer season, it would no doubt be a good thing for our elders to work among the people, as suggested by Brother Taylor. Brother Woodruff related his experience in this line in Germany. Brother Clawson saw no objection to the commissary department of the Southern States mission inasmuch as it supplied good, respectable clothing for the price which missionaries would have to pay for an inferior suit, but in order to do a safe business it should be run as nearly as possible on a cash basis. Brother Smoot made quite lengthy remarks in the same line, holding that inasmuch as this commissary department could furnish respectable and fashionable suits for $15., it was an accommodation to the missionaries, and besides, it was a source of revenue to the mission, as the mission made a profit on the goods. The speaker referred to the custom in England, which was the same as the continental missions, that the first thing elders did was to get a suit of broadcloth and a stovepipe hat, when they arrived in the mission. He believed that all missionaries should be well dressed, and especially if he could get a good suit of clothing for the same price as an ordinary business suit. He felt, however, that the business should be run in a cash basis. President Cannon questioned the wisdom of dressing the Elders uniformly. He said he had no objection to the commissary system of the mission, but felt that if the people would not receive the truth from an elder plainly dressed, they were not worthy of the truth. He thought the matter should be presented to President Snow and requested the brethren to acquaint themselves with the conditions in the Southern States mission in the meantime. It was the sense of the Council that the missionaries should become self sustaining as nearly as possible. ... Twelve met at 10 a.m. in Temple discussed mission matters. Pres[iden]ts [George Q.] Cannon & [Joseph F.] Smith came. no conference. I prayed Pres[ident] Cannon M[outh]. Discussed southern Mission. I not satisfied with Bro[ther] Ben Rich's expl[a]nation in relation to business and finances. Pres[ident]. Cannon feels strong on Subject. I agree with him. It was conceeded that missions were to extravagant and vote was unanimous that elders become selfsustaining near as possible. All the missions should be thoroughly overhauled in the conduct of their business. I am of the opinion that the credit system in Southern states Mission Commisary is altogether wrong as well as some other things. Prince Albert coats is a requisite for every missionary in southern states mission. Too well dressed; singled out for persecution; known everywhere by their dress. Besides our elders are easily persuaded to purchase the "uniform" which is beyond them. they are so well dressed that the people do not open their hearts to give inferior clothes. It was general feeling that elders get work for a short time and earn means instead of burdening their relatives and friends with their calls for money to support them in their missionary fields. (1)


-- Wednesday, Jul 11, 1900
[Apostle John Henry Smith Diary] Salt Lake City

At 9:30 a.m. all of the apostles but Heber J. Grant and John W. Taylor met in council. On motion of Brigham Young it was agreed to recommend to Prest. Lorenzo Snow to allow J. H. Ward $50.00 per month to help him on his paper.

2 p.m. Rudger Clawson and Reed Smoot spoke. Marriner W. Merrill related a dream of Bro. Samuel Roskelly about a large Nephite guarding the entrance to the Logan Temple when a body of U.S. Marshalls were talking of entering there during the Crusade.

Abraham O. Woodruff related a story told by his father of the Prophet Joseph Smith taking a flint arrow spike out of the back bone of a large skeleton found by Zion's Camp on their trip. (2)

Endnotes:
1 - Journal History; Brigham Young Jr., Diary
2 - Jean Bickmore White (editor), Church, State, and Politics: The Diaries of John Henry Smith, Signature Books in association with Smith Research Associates, Salt Lake City, 1990, http://bit.ly/johnhenrysmith

LDS History Chronology: Lorenzo Snow

Mormon History Timeline: the life of Lorenzo Snow
http://lds-church-history.blogspot.com/

--

---
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "LDS Church History" group.
To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to LDS-church-history+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

Lorenzo Snow, Friday, Jun 29, 1900

-- Friday, Jun 29, 1900
[Apostle Rudger Clawson Diary] Salt Lake City. Clear and hot. I spent the day in Brigham City, going at 7 a.m. and returning at 7 p.m. While there I took stock at the Brigham City Roller Mill for the 6 months ending June 30th, 1900, and attended to some other matters of business.

8:30 p.m. Accompanied by Lydia, I attended the wedding reception of LeRoi C. Snow, son of Pres. Lorenzo Snow, and a Miss [Maud Mary] Ford, lately from the East, given in the "Beehive House." It is estimated there were 400 guests present. (1)


-- Jul 2, 1900; Monday
Today Presidents [George Q.] Cannon and [Joseph F.] Smith were at the office. President [Lorenzo] Snow took a short ride during the day but remained most of the time in his room.

The sum of $165. was appropriated in favor of the California Mission to pay the expenses of taking care of and shipping the remains of Elder Beecher who died there a short time ago.

The sum of $200. was also appropriated in favor of the Diamondville branch meeting house.

An order of $2,000. was also issued in favor of Heber J. Grant. Just before the late financial crisis in 1893, Brother Grant donated this amount in addition to some $5,000. or more, in favor of the Temple. Brother Grant gave his I.O.U. for this amount to Bishop [William B.] Preston and was credited on temple donation account. He became virtually bankrupt in consequence of the panic, on his representing to President Snow his inability to lift this obligation, and in view of the fact that he had already donated so liberally, President Snow forgave or cancelled the obligation; but as Bishop Preston had given Brother Grant credit for this amount this order is issued in favor of the Bishop's office to square his books. (2)


-- Jul 5, 1900; Thursday
President [Lorenzo] Snow was feeling much better today, he took a ride yesterday and again today, but is still confined to his room most of the time.

At 11 o'clock the brethren met in the Temple. There were present of the First Presidency, Presidents George Q. Cannon and Joseph F. Smith, of the Apostles, Brigham Young [Jr.], Francis M. Lyman, John W. Taylor, Anthon H. Lund, Matthias F. Cowley, Rudger Clawson and Reed Smoot. ...

A long communication was read from President Ben E. Rich of the Southern States mission, in answer to a communication of the First Presidency to him of the 22 ult. The writer rendered a financial account of the mission and explained to the satisfactory of the Council the questions asked him by the Presidency.

Some time was spent in discussing the advisability of continuing the policy of the Southern States mission furnishing its elders suits of clothes, and making it a requirement that they purchase them, and thus having its elders dressed uniformly.

Brother Young felt that the business policy of the Southern States mission was founded on a false basis, for the reason that it was nothing more or less than a credit system, and must eventually bankrupt itself. He said he could not suggest a remedy for it except to cut the credit system down and do business on a cash basis. He did not favor uniformity in dress of our missionaries; and he feared that the commissary department

produced this effect, that missionaries would learn to trust in it instead of the Lord.

Brother Cowley made quite a lengthy talk giving his experience in the Southern States. He was inclined to the belief that if the commissary department were dispensed with it would cost the elders less for their support than at present.

President Cannon felt that something ought to be done in all of our missions to, if possible, lessen the expense of keeping missionaries, as the strain had become so great on their friends at home that many were already feeling the burden that was upon them.

Brother John W. Taylor remarked that he had by way of experiment, instructed the elders in the Colorado mission to work about a month during the busy season of each year and thereby earn something to pay their own expenses; and he had instructed them not to send home for means for their support. This was of doing had made for themselves friends, and got them school houses to preach in. He felt that if the elders would work during the day and preach at night they would do better. Brother Young added, "And escape persecution."

Brother Lyman now remarked that as persecution generally was aroused during the summer season, it would no doubt be a good thing for our elders to work among the people, as suggested by Brother Taylor.

Brother Woodruff related his experience in this line in Germany.

Brother Clawson saw no objection to the commissary department of the Southern States mission inasmuch as it supplied good, respectable clothing for the price which missionaries would have to pay for an inferior suit, but in order to do a safe business it should be run as nearly as possible on a cash basis.

Brother Smoot made quite lengthy remarks in the same line, holding that inasmuch as this commissary department could furnish respectable and fashionable suits for $15., it was an accommodation to the missionaries, and besides, it was a source of revenue to the mission, as the mission made a profit on the goods. The speaker referred to the custom in England, which was the same as the continental missions, that the first thing elders did was to get a suit of broadcloth and a stovepipe hat, when they arrived in the mission. He believed that all missionaries should be well dressed, and especially if he could get a good suit of clothing for the same price as an ordinary business suit. He felt, however, that the business should be run in a cash basis.

President Cannon questioned the wisdom of dressing the Elders uniformly. He said he had no objection to the commissary system of the mission, but felt that if the people would not receive the truth from an elder plainly dressed, they were not worthy of the truth. He thought the matter should be presented to President Snow and requested the brethren to acquaint themselves with the conditions in the Southern States mission in the meantime. It was the sense of the Council that the missionaries should become self sustaining as nearly as possible. ... (2)

Endnotes:
1 - Stan Larson (editor), A Ministry of Meetings: The Apostolic diaries of Rudger Clawson, Signature Books in association with Smith Research Associates, Salt Lake City, 1993, http://bit.ly/rudgerclawson
2 - First Presidency and Quorum of the Twelve minutes

LDS History Chronology: Lorenzo Snow

Mormon History Timeline: the life of Lorenzo Snow
http://lds-church-history.blogspot.com/

--

---
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "LDS Church History" group.
To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to LDS-church-history+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

Lorenzo Snow, Jun 20, 1900; Wednesday

-- Jun 20, 1900; Wednesday
President [Lorenzo] Snow had a good night and feels much better today. Presidents [George Q.] Cannon and [Joseph F.] Smith were at the office.

The deal made by Brother Heber J. Grant with President Snow, as trustee-in-Trust, by which fifty and one one hundredths of the capital stock in the Salt Lake Theatre passes to the Church was consummated today by the exchange of stocks. (1)


-- Jun 28, 1900; Thursday
President [Lorenzo] Snow was not feeling so well this morning, he did not rest well and vomited considerably in the night. Presidents [George Q.] Cannon and [Joseph F.] Smith were at the office in the morning and again in the afternoon.

The meeting of the Presidency and the Apostles was convened in the Temple at 11 o'clock. There were present Presidents George Q. Cannon and Joseph F. Smith, Brigham Young [Jr.], Francis M. Lyman, Anthon H. Lund, Abraham O[wen]. Woodruff, Rudger Clawson and Reed Smoot. ...

Brother Reed Smoot, who was appointed to attend the funeral services of those of our people who fell victim in the Scofield [Utah] disaster, and who had since interested himself more or less in their behalf with the officials of the coal company, now presented a proposition to be made to the survivors as full settlement in the shape of damages. This proposition is on the basis of monthly payments for three years, and the amount to be paid and divided, will amount to something more than $100,000. It is understood that the distribution of the general contributions will be made in bulk, thereby giving the sufferers something in hand, while the company?s gift will be paid monthly. The Council were unanimous in feeling that the company's proposition ought to be accepted by the sufferers in full settlement, and in order that Brother Smoot might feel authorized to advise our people to accept the proposition, the following motion became the sense of the Council: That we consider the terms as read by Brother Smoot and understood by us as satisfactory, and that he be authorized to advise the people to accept the company's proposition.

Brother Smoot stated that the Utah Loan and Trust Company's

business could not be wound up for less than a payment of thirty-five thousand dollars by the church; and he advised that this bank be closed as soon as possible, as its condition was gradually getting worse and worse, [to] say nothing of a monthly loss of $350. expenses in running it over its income. Nothing could be done about it in the absence of President Snow. ... (1)

Endnotes:
1 - First Presidency and Quorum of the Twelve minutes

LDS History Chronology: Lorenzo Snow

Mormon History Timeline: the life of Lorenzo Snow
http://lds-church-history.blogspot.com/

--

---
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "LDS Church History" group.
To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to LDS-church-history+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

Lorenzo Snow, Jun 8, 1900

-- Jun 8, 1900
[Temple] [Lorenzo Snow to Franklin S. Bramwell, June 8, 1900] The mission presidents have nothing whatever to do with recommending their people to the temple, for the reason that it is understood that only Saints living in a gathered condition, that is, in a ward and stake organization are recommended for temple work. * It does not necessarily follow there should not be exceptions to it. For instance, a mission president might know of Saints of long standing and experience in the Church under his jurisdiction possessing all the qualifications of worthiness for temple blessings and he might see special reasons why such parties should have the blessings of the temple; * [he] would be at liberty to present such cases to us on their individual merits without the knowledge of the parties so recommended, and if we should see fit to make an exception * he could then be authorized to issue recommends accordingly, to be countersigned by us. (1)


-- Jun 12, 1900; Tuesday
President [Lorenzo] Snow passed a poor night. He called in Dr. Joseph S. Richards who tried to relieve the pain which he was suffering which was extremely acute Presidents. [George Q.] Cannon and [Joseph F.] Smith were at the office all day. About half past one President Snow was administered to. (2)


-- Jun 14, 1900; Thursday
President [Lorenzo] Snow spent a very poor night but is comparatively free from pain.

At 11 o'clock the council meeting of the Presidency and Apostles convened in the Temple, there were present: Presidents George Q. Cannon and Joseph F. Smith, Elders Brigham Young [Jr.],

Francis M. Lyman, John Henry Smith, George Teasdale, Heber J. Grant, Matthias F. Cowley, Rudger Clawson and Reed Smoot. ...

President Cannon now brought before the Council the business of Brother B[righam]. Y. Hampton, the committee having recommended that his claim be recognized and paid in full. President Cannon stated that President Snow had signified his willingness to the paying of Brother Hampton the full amount stating that Brother Hampton had risked everything for the purpose of serving his brethren, and although he had erred in going beyond the law to show up the hypocrisy and wickedness of those who were then prosecuting polygamists, he doubtless felt that there was no other way by which he could accomplish his purpose, and his present financial and physical condition was such as to call for assistance, he having lost everything and was without means of support. President Cannon drew attention to the fact that it had been mentioned by some of the brethren that Brother Hampton ought to write a letter to the Presidency acknowledging that the Church authorities knew nothing of the work he did until after he had commenced it, which President Cannon said was the fact, but in consequence of the fact that what he did was in the interest of polygamists and the Church generally, he thought the Church should pay him what was coming to him; that this would leave the Church in its proper position. Others of the brethren felt that no papers should pass, but that Brother Hampton should be paid. After several of the brethren had expressed themselves on this subject, it became the sense of the meeting, on motion of Brother Smoot, that when $3,600. shall be paid to Brother Hampton to satisfy the claim which he makes, that a receipt in full for all demands or claims against the Church up to date be taken of him.

President Cannon intimated that in order to free the authorities of the Church from all suspicion of having been connected directly or indirectly with Brother Hampton's detective work, he should not rest satisfied until all the men who participated in that business be brought together before the Apostles, and the proceedings of the meeting fully reported. ...

Brother Lund reported that he had received a cablegram from President of the Scandinavian mission asking if he should buy the property referred to in this journal, for meetinghouse purposes, at Copenhagen. On motion of President Smith, Brother Lund was authorized to telegraph yes. ...

President Canon sought the mind of the Council as to who should prepare the proposed receipt to be given by B[righam]. Y. Hampton. It was decided that it be done by Attorney F[ranklin]. S. Richards. ...

The sum of $600. was appropriated in favor of H. S. Harris, of Mexico, it being the annual amount allowed him to prosecute his studies in Mexican constitutional law. (2)

Endnotes:
1 - Anderson, Devery; The Development of LDS Temple Worship, 1846-2000: A Documentary History, http://amzn.to/TempleWorship
2 - First Presidency and Quorum of the Twelve minutes

LDS History Chronology: Lorenzo Snow

Mormon History Timeline: the life of Lorenzo Snow
http://lds-church-history.blogspot.com/

--

---
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "LDS Church History" group.
To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to LDS-church-history+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

Lorenzo Snow, Friday, Jun 8, 1900

-- Friday, Jun 8, 1900
[Apostle John Henry Smith Diary] Salt Lake City

I met H. J. Grant, John W. Taylor, William Salmon, and Andrew Smith and We had a talk with Brigham Y. Hampton over his efforts to get some lewd non-Mormons arrested for a check to the prosecutions of our brethren. He said the selectmen of the County hired him as a detective and did not pay him.

I and my sons put up some fence. I had a short visit with President Lorenzo Snow, he in bad health. (1)


-- Jun 8, 1900
Experimental missionary training courses-- Salt Lake City.

See notes for letter of December 27, 1899 earlier in this volume. Evidently the first year's experimental courses in missionary methods given in Church schools had proved enough of a success to justify continuance.

Office of The First Presidency of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Salt Lake City, Utah, June 8th, 1900.

President M. W. Merrill,

DEAR BROTHER:

The experimental missionary courses given by our direction in several of our Church institutions of learning during the past academic year, were sufficiently successful to warrant, in our opinion, a continuation of the practice. We entertain the hope that with the experience of the last school year to guide us and an early preparation for the coming one that still more satisfactory work will be done. We therefore invite you to select and forward to the missionary Committee of the Apostles at your early convenience the names of a number of young brethren whom you deem suitable to take a missionary course with a view to their being called into the field of active missionary labor as soon as they are prepared for its responsibilities. When these names are received by us, to each of the young men thus suggested will be sent a call to attend one of our church colleges or academies where these classes are held. If for convenience or economy's sake any of the brethren prefer to attend one of these institutions which is not geographically the nearest they can have that privilege, and you should note their wishes on your report so that the Committee may be properly advised.

With love,

Your Brother, LORENZO SNOW. {1900 June 8-Circular letter, Church Historian's Library,} (2)

Endnotes:
1 - Jean Bickmore White (editor), Church, State, and Politics: The Diaries of John Henry Smith, Signature Books in association with Smith Research Associates, Salt Lake City, 1990, http://bit.ly/johnhenrysmith
2 - Clark, James R., Messages of the First Presidency (6 volumes)

LDS History Chronology: Lorenzo Snow

Mormon History Timeline: the life of Lorenzo Snow
http://lds-church-history.blogspot.com/

--

---
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "LDS Church History" group.
To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to LDS-church-history+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

Lorenzo Snow, Jun 7, 1900; Thursday

-- Jun 7, 1900; Thursday
Presidents [George Q.] Cannon and [Joseph F.] Smith were at the office. President [Lorenzo] Snow confined to his bed.

At 11 o'clock meeting at the Temple. There were present: Presidents George Q. Cannon and Joseph F. Smith, Elders Brigham Young [Jr.], John Henry Smith, George Teasdale, Heber J. Grant, Anthon H. Lund, Rudger Clawson and Reed Smoot. ...

The brethren reassembled. A letter was read from President Andrew Kimball setting forth that on account of poor prospects for crops this season it was deemed best by the Presidency and High Council of St. Joseph [Arizona] Stake for the brethren to take the railroading contract, and Brother Kimball was authorized to take such a contract as president of the Mormon colony. This he did much to his disappointment and chagrin, as nearly all who had promised to aid him deserted him, leaving him to hire Gentiles to do the work with the odds greatly against him. He asked that he might be temporarily excused from stake duties to carry out what in good faith he had undertaken to do on behalf of his people, and if consistent the Presidency to write him a letter on the subject that could be read at the next Stake Priesthood meeting on the subject.

President Smith moved that the Secretary get up a good kind letter expressing sympathy with Brother Kimball in his unfortunate

position, also expressing the wish that the people will yet unite in carrying out the spirit of the contract. This motion was carried.

Brother Grant reported that he had met with the Priesthood meeting of the Granite [Utah] Stake and presented the resignation of Bishop A[pollos]. G. Driggs, which was accepted. Bishop Driggs having authorized this action. At the meeting Brother Millen Atwood was selected as successor to Bishop Driggs, with Ed. (?) Wood and John M. Whitaker as his counselors. After this had been done Bishop Driggs met Brother Grant and regretted having resigned, and asked that another chance be given him, assuring Brother Grant that the people of the ward would sustain him. Brother Grant said that he had no desire to displace a Bishop against the will of the people, but from what he had learned he feared the result of testing the will of the people would prove a humiliation to him, but on account of this attitude of the Bishop no change had yet been made in the Bishopric of Sugar House [Utah] ward.

This matter was now considered and it was the sense of the brethren that the change be effected.

Brother Grant now stated that it was his opinion and the opinion of others to whom he had talked on the subject that Bishop David B. Brinton ought to be released. President Cannon suggested that it would be better for the recommendation to come from the Presidency of the Stake who might communicate their recommendations in writing. Elder Grant thought that this plan was the better way and therefore will communicate with President Frank Y. Taylor, with whom he has already talked over the matter. ...

A letter from President William H. Smart, acknowledging receipt of the action of the Council on the question of missionaries being required to tithe moneys received by them for their support while laboring in the mission field. The writer asked whether this applied to means that had not been tithed at home and to gifts to the Elders from friends and sundry associations.

President Smith, in expressing himself on this subject said that while it was clear to him that means sent by parents for the support of their missionary sons was not subject to be tithed, he thought that gifts received by the Elders while in the field should be tithed.

Elder Grant thought that where parents failed to tithe the means sent to their missionary sons that it should be paid in the mission field.

Elder John Henry Smith felt that missionaries should not be required to path tithes on the little gifts made them in the field which went towards their support, nor did he think that the means sent by parents for this purpose should be tithed. The missionary in the field was already doing all that he possibly could do, and all that could be asked of him to do, and his food and clothing were necessary to his existence and to enable him to perform his missionary labors.

Brother Grant moved that President Smart be authorized to

continue t[he] policy as affecting gifts received by Elders and means received for their support from home not previously tithed. The motion was seconded and carried.

The Council now adjourned, and at the request of President Snow all assembled at his room and administered to him.

B[righam]. Y. Hampton called at the office in the afternoon by appointment. He had written several letters in reference to a claim made by him on the Church for means expended in detective work during the raid at the time of the Edmunds-Tucker Bill.9 Instead of going into the matter at the present time a committee consisting of John Henry Smith, Heber J. Grant and John W. Taylor was appointed with Brothers Andrew Smith and William W. Salmon who had been added, the latter brethren having been more or less engaged with Brother Hampton in this work, to meet with Brother Hampton and consider his claims. A week from today was set for the hearing.

9JOHN, THIS HAD TO DO WITH A STING OPERATION SET UP IN ONE OF THE CITY'S HOUSES OF PROSTITUTION.

(1)


-- Jun 7, 1900
Presidents [George Q.] Cannon and [Joseph F.] Smith were at the office. President [Lorenzo] Snow confined to his bed. At 11 o'clock meeting at the Temple. There were present: Presidents George Q. Cannon and Joseph F. Smith, Elders Brigham Young [Jr.], John Henry Smith, George Teasdale, Heber J. Grant, Anthon H. Lund, Rudger Clawson and Reed Smoot. ... The brethren reassembled. A letter was read from President Andrew Kimball setting forth that on account of poor prospects for crops this season it was deemed best by the Presidency and High Council of St. Joseph [Arizona] Stake for the brethren to take the railroading contract, and Brother Kimball was authorized to take such a contract as president of the Mormon colony. This he did much to his disappointment and chagrin, as nearly all who had promised to aid him deserted him, leaving him to hire Gentiles to do the work with the odds greatly against him. He asked that he might be temporarily excused from stake duties to carry out what in good faith he had undertaken to do on behalf of his people, and if consistent the Presidency to write him a letter on the subject that could be read at the next Stake Priesthood meeting on the subject. President Smith moved that the Secretary get up a good kind letter expressing sympathy with Brother Kimball in his unfortunate position, also expressing the wish that the people will yet unite in carrying out the spirit of the contract. This motion was carried. Brother Grant reported that he had met with the Priesthood meeting of the Granite [Utah] Stake and presented the resignation of Bishop A[pollos]. G. Driggs, which was accepted. Bishop Driggs having authorized this action. At the meeting Brother Millen Atwood was selected as successor to Bishop Driggs, with Ed. (?) Wood and John M. Whitaker as his counselors. After this had been done Bishop Driggs met Brother Grant and regretted having resigned, and asked that another chance be given him, assuring Brother Grant that the people of the ward would sustain him. Brother Grant said that he had no desire to displace a Bishop against the will of the people, but from what he had learned he feared the result of testing the will of the people would prove a humiliation to him, but on account of this attitude of the Bishop no change had yet been made in the Bishopric of Sugar House [Utah] ward. This matter was now considered and it was the sense of the brethren that the change be effected. Brother Grant now stated that it was his opinion and the opinion of others to whom he had talked on the subject that Bishop David B. Brinton ought to be released. President Cannon suggested that it would be better for the recommendation to come from the Presidency of the Stake who might communicate their recommendations in writing. Elder Grant thought that this plan was the better way and therefore will communicate with President Frank Y. Taylor, with whom he has already talked over the matter. ... A letter from President William H. Smart, acknowledging receipt of the action of the Council on the question of missionaries being required to tithe moneys received by them for their support while laboring in the mission field. The writer asked whether this applied to means that had not been tithed at home and to gifts to the Elders from friends and sundry associations. President Smith, in expressing himself on this subject said that while it was clear to him that means sent by parents for the support of their missionary sons was not subject to be tithed, he thought that gifts received by the Elders while in the field should be tithed. Elder Grant thought that where parents failed to tithe the means sent to their missionary sons that it should be paid in the mission field. Elder John Henry Smith felt that missionaries should not be required to path tithes on the little gifts made them in the field which went towards their support, nor did he think that the means sent by parents for this purpose should be tithed. The missionary in the field was already doing all that he possibly could do, and all that could be asked of him to do, and his food and clothing were necessary to his existence and to enable him to perform his missionary labors. Brother Grant moved that President Smart be authorized to continue t[he] policy as affecting gifts received by Elders and means received for their support from home not previously tithed. The motion was seconded and carried. The Council now adjourned, and at the request of President Snow all assembled at his room and administered to him. B[righam]. Y. Hampton called at the office in the afternoon by appointment. He had written several letters in reference to a claim made by him on the Church for means expended in detective work during the raid at the time of the Edmunds-Tucker Bill. Instead of going into the matter at the present time a committee consisting of John Henry Smith, Heber J. Grant and John W. Taylor was appointed with Brothers Andrew Smith and William W. Salmon who had been added, the latter brethren having been more or less engaged with Brother Hampton in this work, to meet with Brother Hampton and consider his claims. A week from today was set for the hearing. Attended Circle & Council meeting in Temple 8 [of] Twelve present. Pres[idents]. Geo[rge]. Q. [Cannon] & Jos[eph]. F [Smith] presiding. The twelve met at 10 oclock much talk about B[righam]. Y[oung]. Trust Co[mpany] running a whore house on Commercial St[reet]. Pres[ident]. G[eorge] Q. C[annon] president & B[righam]. Y[oung]. [Jr.] Vice president Jos[eph]. F. S[mith]. director on B[righam] Y[oung] board. We all disapprove of it and I expressed myself as determined to get out of it. (2)

Endnotes:
1 - First Presidency and Quorum of the Twelve minutes
2 - Journal History; Brigham Young Jr., Diary

LDS History Chronology: Lorenzo Snow

Mormon History Timeline: the life of Lorenzo Snow
http://lds-church-history.blogspot.com/

--

---
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "LDS Church History" group.
To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to LDS-church-history+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

More History?

Want more Mormon history? Check out Today-in-Mormon-History, daily snippets of what happened on this day in Mormon Church History. More info can be found here: http://bit.ly/tdmh

--

---
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "LDS Church History" group.
To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to LDS-church-history+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.