Lorenzo Snow, Jul 31, 1900; Tuesday

-- Jul 31, 1900; Tuesday
President [Lorenzo] Snow came to the office at 11 o'clock and met some gentlemen who came for the

purpose of complaining against Mr. Miller, for treatment they had received at Saltair. Among these men were the chairman of the executive committee of the Grand Army, the chairman of the executive committee of the Elks and members of the Odd fellows. They stated that there were three other societies who were full of complaints against the treatment they had received in a business way from the manager of that resort, Mr. Miller. President Snow expressed regret at hearing these complaints against Mr. Miller, and stated that he would have taken pleasure in rectifying them if he had been appealed to before these parties made other arrangements.

President [George Q.] Cannon came to the office about one o'clock having been engaged all the forenoon at the office of the Union Light and Power Co[mpany].'s office. (1)


-- Aug 2, 1900; Thursday
President [Lorenzo] Snow was at the office today, also President [George Q.] Cannon. President [Joseph F.] Smith is in Mexico.

At 11 o'clock meeting in the Temple. There were present: Presidents Lorenzo Snow and George Q. Cannon, Francis M. Lyman, John Henry Smith, George Teasdale, Heber J. Grant, John W. Taylor, Anthon H. Lund, Rudger Clawson and Reed Smoot. ... (1)


-- Aug 4, 1900; Saturday
President [Lorenzo] Snow was at the office. President [George Q.] Cannon attending the Jordan [Utah] Stake conference.

A Miss Jenkins, a school teacher of Kansas City [Missouri], called and had a talk with President Snow on some of the doctrines of the Church. Also Archie McAllister, a grandson of President Snow called with his wife and had a short visit.

Bishop William B. Preston and Horace G. Whitney called. President Snow submitted to them a written proposition made by President George Q. Cannon, as the head of the George Q. Cannon & Sons Company, in which President Cannon offers to sell out to the Church the entire business of the company including his presses; but this is not to include the Juvenile Instructor. This matter was talked over, and it was concluded to have someone on the part of the News to go through the stock and machinery with a view to estimating its value.

On the 25 ult. a letter was read written to Presidents Snow and Cannon and Elder Anthon H. Lund from S. P. Neve, and the following is taken from it as a criticism on Elder Andrew Jenson's work entitled "Church Chronology:"

While the book contains many references to its author and compiler, whose works and movements are paraded as events of great importance, it is silent regarding men far more worthy and much more prominent than himself and whose works are of greater consequence than anything he has ever done. I notice he omits all mention of such widely known and valuable works as parley P. Pratt's Autobiography; George Q. Cannon's History of Joseph Smith, and his History of Brigham Young, [Edward] Tullidge's, [Huber Howe] Bancroft's and [Orson F.] Whitney's Histories of Utah; B. H. Roberts' Life of John (1)

Endnotes:
1 - First Presidency and Quorum of the Twelve minutes

LDS History Chronology: Lorenzo Snow

Mormon History Timeline: the life of Lorenzo Snow
http://lds-church-history.blogspot.com/

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Lorenzo Snow, Jul 26, 1900; Thursday

-- Jul 26, 1900; Thursday
President George Q. Cannon

accompanied Elder Anthon H. Lund to the Historian's Office this morning and introduced him to the employees as the Church Historian and Recorder, as the successor to Elder Franklin D. Richards, deceased. All the hands of the office were present excepting Elder A. Milton Musser. A letter was addressed to Brother Lund yesterday by the Presidency giving him instructions in regard to the duties of his new office, which letter was read to the employees, who all seemed pleased with the selection and congratulated Elder Lund.

While the understanding with the Presidency is that this is but a temporary appointment, the letter referred to does not carry that meaning.

At 11 o'clock the brethren met in the Temple. There were present. Of the First Presidency, Presidents George Q. Cannon and Joseph F. Smith, of the Apostles quorum; Francis M. Lyman, John Henry Smith, George Teasdale, Heber J. grant, John W. Taylor, Anthon H. Lund, Matthias F. Cowley, Rudger Clawson, Reed Smoot and Abraham O[wen]. Woodruff. ...

President Cannon informed the council that the First Presidency had concluded to put Brother Lund in the office of Church Historian. The announcement met with general satisfaction.

At the last meeting the advisability of sending someone into Mexico to meet with the B[righanm]. Y[oung]. Academy Expedition, was referred to the First Presidency, and President Cannon now informed the Brethren that President Snow felt that it would be well to send President Joseph F. Smith who would start Friday night accompanied by Elder Seymour B. Young. ...

President Cannon now called for a vote of the brethren on the appointment of Elder Anthon H. Lund as successor to the late Elder Franklin D. Richards, as Church Historian and Recorder. Elder Lyman moved that the Council sustain the action, carried unanimously.

The action of the Presidency in sending President Smith and Seymour B. Young to Mexico was also sustained on motion of Elder Rudger Clawson.

Elder Lyman remarked that the subject of employing an architect to prepare plans for new meeting houses had been talked of more or less by the brethren of the Apostles, and he now said it did seem to him that this ought to be done both with a view of economy as well as beauty of design, as many of the wards were building beyond their strength, and means. He thought the subject worthy of the attention of the Council sometime when President Snow could be present. ... (1)


-- Jul 28, 1900; Saturday
This morning Elders Heber J. Grant and Horace G. Whitney came to the office for the purpose of conferring with President [Lorenzo] Snow on the business mentioned in yesterday's journal. President Snow came in the office from his room in the Beehive House and in connection with President [George Q.] Cannon heard what these brethren had to say in relation to the proposition to turn the Herald over to the Church and have some one appointed to run it as a Democratic paper as it has always been. President Snow told these brethren that there was but one answer to give, and that was that the Church could not undertake to do any such thing as this, and Brother Whitney was to coney this answer to Mr. [Alfred W.] McCune. With this decision President Cannon fully agreed. After this short interview President Snow again returned to this room as he was not feeling so well this morning. (1)

Endnotes:
1 - First Presidency and Quorum of the Twelve minutes

LDS History Chronology: Lorenzo Snow

Mormon History Timeline: the life of Lorenzo Snow
http://lds-church-history.blogspot.com/

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Lorenzo Snow, Tuesday, Jul 24, 1900

-- Tuesday, Jul 24, 1900
[Apostle Rudger Clawson Diary] Salt Lake City. Clear and mild. Pioneer Day. The ceremonies connected with the unveiling of the Brigham Young Statue at the head of Main Street took place at 10 a.m. The statue and pedestal were draped with American flags and a platform was built around them for the accommodation of the speakers and prominent people. A large crowd had gathered around the stand. The following program was carried out, to wit:

The assembly was called to order by Hon. Jas. Sharp. Address, Pres. Geo. Q. Cannon. He recited the achievements of Brigham Young and the pioneers. Dwelt upon the hardships of early days. Spoke of the incident whereby the people were saved from starvation by the sea gulls, which came in myriads, and destroyed the crickets, and thus saved the crops. Spoke of the gold fever that in early days took possession of the people, and how that Brigham Young counseled them to remain and develop the resources of the country and let the gold fields alone. Spoke of his wise counsels and timely instructions in all the trying situations of pioneer days. Said that the story of the emigration to and peopling of these valleys of the mountains should live in the minds of our children. This statue and monument will serve to remind them of these things.

An address, introducing C[yrus] E. Dallin, sculptor, through whose genius the statue of Brigham Young was brought forth, [by] Hon. Jas. T. Hammond. Address, [by] C. E. Dallin, sculptor.

The statue was unveiled at 11 a.m., the ceremony being performed by Margaret Young, great granddaughter of Brigham Young. In addition to the statue of Brigham Young, which rested upon the top of the pedestal, there were two figures and a group in bronze just finished and put in place for the unveiling. One of the figures represented a trapper and the other an Indian. The group represented a family of pioneers. The entire monument as now completed and unveiled is very fine.

Lydia and myself and the children spent the afternoon at Liberty Park. We took picnic with us, which added something of interest to the outing.

I have often said that if I were a wealthy man, I would set aside a portion of my means to be used in the temple for the salvation of the dead. There are many good people in the church who can be employed to work for the dead, and I have ascertained that it will cost from 75c to $1.00 for each dead person who is baptized for and endowed, which work, if accepted by them, means salvation to their souls; and Pres. Lorenzo Snow says that in nine cases out of ten the work will be accepted, so that, it might be said, there is very little risk connected with an investment of this kind. How beautiful it is in cases where men have means, but little or no time to spend in missionary work or to labor themselves in the temple that they should devote a portion of that means for the salvation of the dead, rather than to leave a great lot of means for their children to quarrel over. Now, I am not a man of means, but to show forth the sincerity of my desire, I have decided to set aside a

small part of my monthly income for the purpose above explained and shall start the fund with $4.00. I hope in the future to accomplish much good, under the blessing of the Lord, from this very small beginning. (1)


-- Jul 25, 1900; Wednesday
President [Lorenzo] Snow came to the office this morning and remained a short time. When he came in President [George Q.] Cannon was talking with Brother Anthon H. Lund, informing him of the selection which had been made of himself to take charge of the Historian's Office. The President then joined in the conversation. The Presidency, he said, have felt for a long time that the Historian's office is greatly in need of executive guidance and system, and they impressed Brother Lund with this idea. Two letters were now read, one of which President Snow had heard before, one of these was from Brother Martin S. Lindsay, and the other from Brother S. P. Neve, and both reflected on Brother Andrew Jenson personally. These letters were handed to Elder Lund for his consideration.

President [Joseph F.] Smith came to the office at 12:30 today.

Brother Anthony W. Ivins was telegraphed to on Friday as to the whereabouts of the [Brigham Young] Academy Expedition. His answer came today as follows: "Expedition either at Nogales or between that point and Juarez; expected here about the first."

Brother Guy Wilson and wife, who are about to return to Mexico, were blessed under the hands of Presidents Cannon and Smith and Elder John Henry Smith.

Word was sent from the office to Elder Seymour B. Young in Parley's Canyon informing him that he had been selected to accompany President Joseph F. Smith to Mexico. (2)

Endnotes:
1 - Stan Larson (editor), A Ministry of Meetings: The Apostolic diaries of Rudger Clawson, Signature Books in association with Smith Research Associates, Salt Lake City, 1993, http://bit.ly/rudgerclawson
2 - First Presidency and Quorum of the Twelve minutes

LDS History Chronology: Lorenzo Snow

Mormon History Timeline: the life of Lorenzo Snow
http://lds-church-history.blogspot.com/

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Lorenzo Snow, Jul 19, 1900

-- Jul 19, 1900
At 11 o'clock the council meeting of the Presidency and the Apostles was held in the Temple. There were present: Presidents George Q. Cannon and Joseph F. Smith, Brigham Young [Jr.], F[rancis]. M. Lyman, John Henry Smith, George Teasdale, Heber J. Grant, John W. Taylor, Anthon H. Lund, Matthias F. Cowley, Rudger Clawson and Reed Smoot. ... Brother Grant now referred to the correspondence read at this council from Pres[ident]. Andrew Kimball, and said Brother Taylor and himself learned that Brother Kimball had entered into a private contract with the railroad people which he could not carry out, and that the people of his stake were under no obligation whatever to help him carry his burden. He was advised to get out of it as soon as possible. They learned that the contractors were advancing means to pay his men as he was not making enough to meet his payroll; and they believed the railroad people were too smart for Brother Kimball; that they were making him believe that the honor of the whole Mormon people was at stake in his failure to carry out the contract he had entered into, which they believed was a one- sided affair. At first the contract was made in the name of Phillips and Kimball, but Phillips threw it up as soon as he saw a mistake had been made, and it would have ruined him to have gone on with it. These brethren felt that Brother Kimball should have done as Brother Phillips did, but instead of doing that he obligated himself to carry out the contract himself, and he was now paying dearly for his experience. Brother Grant said that after talking with Brother Kimball and showing him that his people were in no way bound, morally or any other way to stand by him in his undertaking, he had to admit that this was the fact, although loath to do so. He still felt, to use his own language, that he was entitled to their moral support. Brother Grant now drew the attention of the council to the great responsibility the Church was assuming, either directly or indirectly, in allowing the B[righam]. Y[oung]. Academy Expedition to go on according to the program mapped out by its leader, Brother [Benjamin] Cluff. From what he had seen and heard he freely and frankly stated that the expedition ought to be disbanded. His reasons for this were these: In the first place he thought it was a big mistake in the Church allowing Brother Cluff to carry out his expedition ideas under Church auspices, as the members of the expedition were of the opinion that in responding to the request of Brother Cluff to join the expedition that they were doing nothing more nor less than performing missionary duties. The Expedition consisted of a crowd of young men without experience, and it was not at all unlikely that when they got into Mexico they would have their horses and baggage stolen from them, and perhaps get into worse trouble. Speaking of the morals of the expedition he said that their behavior at Thatcher was unbecoming; and as evidence of Brother Cluff's poor judgment Brother Grant said he invited Bro[ther]. Mosiah Hancock, a man well on to seventy years, to accompany the expedition believing that they might find some new plates as a result of their explorations. Brother Grant could not help but believe that they would be in jeopardy of their lives and belongings while traveling in Mexico. He heard that in nearly every settlement Brother Cluff had invited some one or more to accompany the expedition, and it was generally understood that it was a church affair. If this be so, the speaker felt that some experienced man or men should go with them. He verily believed that if they were allowed to go on they would never reach to the place of their destination, and that the Church would be put to great expense to bring them home again. If they were allowed to go on he believed the number should be reduced, and he also had reason to believe that some of the boys would be pleased to be released. He believed also it was a grave and serious mistake, and that lives would be lost unless something were done to either reduce or disband the expedition. ... Brother Young suggested that Brother J. H. Ward receive the usual amount allowed him to help in the publication of the German paper, the "Beobachter." He had received $30. a month for the past six months in addition to a special appropriation, and Brother Young thought he was worthy of more. It was the sense of the council that Brother Ward be allowed what he had asked for, namely, the special appropriation of $10. a month be continued with the addition of what he was already receiving, making in all $40. a month. ... President Cannon sent word to President [Lorenzo] Snow, at his residence, Beehive House, that he and President Smith would like to confer with him in regard to the Brigham Young Academy expedition when he should be able to meet with them. President Snow has been confined to the house for some time on account of poor health. Attended meeting in Temple. One of twelve asked what are the limits of authority of the 12 in the stakes. I answered, the inspiration of the Holy Spirit. Pres[idents]. [George Q.] Cannon [and] [Joseph F.] Smith came in soon after 11 a.m. Bro[ther]. H[eber]. J. Grant reported on his visit to Mexico and commented severely on the [Benjamin] Cluff expedition to South America said his company of men with two or three exceptions are babies. Voted to submit question to Presidency and if deemed advisable which we were united in, will order them to change to water route. Feeling is strong in south that these inexperienced weaklings will fall easy prey to bandits, lose their horses and some of them their lives if the loose manner of conducting the party is continued. I want a Captain to guard the scientific members while they do their duty. Others reported. (1)


-- Jul 20, 1900; Friday
President [Lorenzo] Snow came in the office today long enough to confer with his counselors in relation to the subject of the B[righam]. Y[oung]. Academy exploration expedition. Elder Brigham Young [Jr.] was also present. After hearing the substance of Elder Heber J. Grant's report, President Snow stated that he felt that something should be done in the matter, and the names of the brethren were canvassed with a view to selecting the most suitable person to go to Juarez where the Expedition will be in a few days. Nothing was done, however, but it was understood that they would talk the matter over further before deciding.

About four o'clock in the afternoon Elder Brigham Young informed President Cannon that he was about to leave tonight to fill an appointment to the San Luis [Colorado/New Mexico] Stake,

but that he did not feel free to leave without so informing President Snow as his name had been mentioned in the meeting held this morning in connection with others as one who might be asked to go to Mexico for the purpose of carrying out the wishes of the Presidency in regard to the expedition. President Cannon sent Brother George F. Gibbs in to the Beehive House to see President Snow and inform him of Brother Young's intended departure, whereupon President Snow asked President Cannon to come in and confer with him on the subject. The result of the interview was that Brother Young might go ahead and keep his appointment, as it was likely that President Joseph F. Smith would be selected to go to Juarez on the Expedition matter.

A telegram was sent to Brother A[nthony]. W. Ivins inquiring the whereabouts of the exploring party, and informing him that President Snow desired to communicate with Brother [Benjamin] Cluff.

In the forenoon President Snow stated to President Cannon that he contemplated placing someone in temporary charge of the Historian's Office, and mentioned Anthon H. Lund for that place. President Cannon agreed with the idea that someone should be placed in charge of the Historian's Office for the present, but doubted the wisdom of tying up one of the Apostles when other suitable persons might be found to do that work, until a permanent historian could be chosen. President Snow coincided with this view. (2)

Endnotes:
1 - Journal History; Brigham Young Jr., Diary
2 - First Presidency and Quorum of the Twelve minutes

LDS History Chronology: Lorenzo Snow

Mormon History Timeline: the life of Lorenzo Snow
http://lds-church-history.blogspot.com/

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Lorenzo Snow, Saturday, Jul 14, 1900

-- Saturday, Jul 14, 1900
[Apostle Rudger Clawson Diary] Salt Lake City. Clear and warm. I spent the forenoon at the President's office. At 2 p.m. a meeting was held at the President's office. Present: President[s] Lorenzo Snow, Geo. Q. Cannon, [and] Joseph F. Smith, Apostles B. Young, Reed Smoot, and myself, and Elders Robt. T. Burton, J. R. Winder, F. S. Richards, and G. F. Gibbs, clerk.

The object of the meeting was to consider the matter of closing up the Utah Loan and Trust Co.'s business. Apostle Reed Smoot, one of the committee appointed by the Presidency and council of Apostles, made a brief report of the condition of said banking company, as follows, to wit:

Assets

$31,382

Donations promised

12,000

$43,382

Liabilities

107,670.11

Less certificates of deposits made by H. J. Grant

28,774.11

78,896

Less assets

43,382

Deficiency

$35,514

It was moved by Pres. Cannon and seconded by Jno. R. Winder that $35,000, or so much of it as may be needed, be set apart by the Trustee-in-Trust to liquidate the deficiency of the Utah Loan and Trust Co. and that the matter be submitted to the First Presidency and Twelve at their next meeting for their approval. Carried by unanimous vote. (1)


-- Jul 19, 1900; Thursday
At 11 o'clock the council meeting of the Presidency and the Apostles was held in the Temple. There were present: Presidents George Q. Cannon and Joseph F. Smith, Brigham Young [Jr.], F[rancis]. M. Lyman, John Henry Smith, George Teasdale, Heber J. Grant, John W. Taylor, Anthon H. Lund, Matthias F. Cowley, Rudger Clawson and Reed Smoot. ...

Brother Grant now referred to the correspondence read at this council from Pres[ident]. Andrew Kimball, and said Brother Taylor and himself learned that Brother Kimball had entered into a private contract with the railroad people which he could not carry out, and that the people of his stake were under no obligation whatever to help him carry his burden. He was advised to get out of it as soon as possible. They learned that the contractors were advancing means to pay his men as he was not making enough to meet his payroll; and they believed the railroad people were too smart for Brother Kimball; that they were making him believe that the honor of the whole Mormon people was at stake in his failure to carry out the contract he had entered into, which they believed was a one-sided affair. At first the contract was made in the name of Phillips and Kimball, but Phillips threw it up as soon as he saw a mistake had been made, and it would have ruined him to have gone on with it. These brethren felt that Brother Kimball should have done as Brother Phillips did, but instead of doing that he obligated himself to carry out the contract himself, and he was now paying dearly for his experience.

Brother Grant said that after talking with Brother Kimball and showing him that his people were in no way bound, morally or any other way to stand by him in his undertaking, he had to admit that this was the fact, although loath to do so. He still felt, to use his own language, that he was entitled to their moral support.

Brother Grant now drew the attention of the council to the great responsibility the Church was assuming, either directly or indirectly, in allowing the B[righam]. Y[oung]. Academy Expedition to go on according to the program mapped out by its leader, Brother [Benjamin] Cluff. From what he had seen and heard he freely and frankly stated that the expedition ought to be disbanded. His reasons for this were these: In the first place he thought it was a big mistake in the Church allowing Brother Cluff to carry out his expedition ideas under Church auspices, as the members of the expedition were of the opinion that in responding to the request of Brother Cluff to join the expedition that they were doing nothing more nor less than performing missionary duties. The Expedition consisted of a crowd of young men without experience, and it was not at all unlikely that when they got into Mexico they would have their horses and baggage stolen from them, and perhaps get into worse trouble. Speaking of the morals of the expedition he said that their behavior at Thatcher was unbecoming; and as evidence of Brother Cluff's poor judgment Brother Grant said he invited Bro[ther]. Mosiah Hancock, a man well on to seventy years, to accompany the expedition believing that they

might find some new plates as a result of their explorations. Brother Grant could not help but believe that they would be in jeopardy of their lives and belongings while traveling in Mexico. He heard that in nearly every settlement Brother Cluff had invited some one or more to accompany the expedition, and it was generally understood that it was a church affair. If this be so, the speaker felt that some experienced man or men should go with them. He verily believed that if they were allowed to go on they would never reach to the place of their destination, and that the Church would be put to great expense to bring them home again. If they were allowed to go on he believed the number should be reduced, and he also had reason to believe that some of the boys would be pleased to be released. He believed also it was a grave and serious mistake, and that lives would be lost unless something were done to either reduce or disband the expedition. ...

Brother Young suggested that Brother J. H. Ward receive the usual amount allowed him to help in the publication of the German paper, the "Beobachter." He had received $30. a month for the past six months in addition to a special appropriation, and Brother Young thought he was worthy of more. It was the sense of the council that Brother Ward be allowed what he had asked for, namely, the special appropriation of $10. a month be continued with the addition of what he was already receiving, making in all $40. a month. ...

President Cannon sent word to President [Lorenzo] Snow, at his residence, Beehive House, that he and President Smith would like to confer with him in regard to the Brigham Young Academy expedition when he should be able to meet with them. President Snow has been confined to the house for some time on account of poor health. (2)

Endnotes:
1 - Stan Larson (editor), A Ministry of Meetings: The Apostolic diaries of Rudger Clawson, Signature Books in association with Smith Research Associates, Salt Lake City, 1993, http://bit.ly/rudgerclawson
2 - First Presidency and Quorum of the Twelve minutes

LDS History Chronology: Lorenzo Snow

Mormon History Timeline: the life of Lorenzo Snow
http://lds-church-history.blogspot.com/

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Lorenzo Snow, Jul 5, 1900

-- Jul 5, 1900
President [Lorenzo] Snow was feeling much better today, he took a ride yesterday and again today, but is still confined to his room most of the time. At 11 o'clock the brethren met in the Temple. There were present of the First Presidency, Presidents George Q. Cannon and Joseph F. Smith, of the Apostles, Brigham Young [Jr.], Francis M. Lyman, John W. Taylor, Anthon H. Lund, Matthias F. Cowley, Rudger Clawson and Reed Smoot. ... A long communication was read from President Ben E. Rich of the Southern States mission, in answer to a communication of the First Presidency to him of the 22 ult. The writer rendered a financial account of the mission and explained to the satisfactory of the Council the questions asked him by the Presidency. Some time was spent in discussing the advisability of continuing the policy of the Southern States mission furnishing its elders suits of clothes, and making it a requirement that they purchase them, and thus having its elders dressed uniformly. Brother Young felt that the business policy of the Southern States mission was founded on a false basis, for the reason that it was nothing more or less than a credit system, and must eventually bankrupt itself. He said he could not suggest a remedy for it except to cut the credit system down and do business on a cash basis. He did not favor uniformity in dress of our missionaries; and he feared that the commissary department produced this effect, that missionaries would learn to trust in it instead of the Lord. Brother Cowley made quite a lengthy talk giving his experience in the Southern States. He was inclined to the belief that if the commissary department were dispensed with it would cost the elders less for their support than at present. President Cannon felt that something ought to be done in all of our missions to, if possible, lessen the expense of keeping missionaries, as the strain had become so great on their friends at home that many were already feeling the burden that was upon them. Brother John W. Taylor remarked that he had by way of experiment, instructed the elders in the Colorado mission to work about a month during the busy season of each year and thereby earn something to pay their own expenses; and he had instructed them not to send home for means for their support. This was of doing had made for themselves friends, and got them school houses to preach in. He felt that if the elders would work during the day and preach at night they would do better. Brother Young added, "And escape persecution." Brother Lyman now remarked that as persecution generally was aroused during the summer season, it would no doubt be a good thing for our elders to work among the people, as suggested by Brother Taylor. Brother Woodruff related his experience in this line in Germany. Brother Clawson saw no objection to the commissary department of the Southern States mission inasmuch as it supplied good, respectable clothing for the price which missionaries would have to pay for an inferior suit, but in order to do a safe business it should be run as nearly as possible on a cash basis. Brother Smoot made quite lengthy remarks in the same line, holding that inasmuch as this commissary department could furnish respectable and fashionable suits for $15., it was an accommodation to the missionaries, and besides, it was a source of revenue to the mission, as the mission made a profit on the goods. The speaker referred to the custom in England, which was the same as the continental missions, that the first thing elders did was to get a suit of broadcloth and a stovepipe hat, when they arrived in the mission. He believed that all missionaries should be well dressed, and especially if he could get a good suit of clothing for the same price as an ordinary business suit. He felt, however, that the business should be run in a cash basis. President Cannon questioned the wisdom of dressing the Elders uniformly. He said he had no objection to the commissary system of the mission, but felt that if the people would not receive the truth from an elder plainly dressed, they were not worthy of the truth. He thought the matter should be presented to President Snow and requested the brethren to acquaint themselves with the conditions in the Southern States mission in the meantime. It was the sense of the Council that the missionaries should become self sustaining as nearly as possible. ... Twelve met at 10 a.m. in Temple discussed mission matters. Pres[iden]ts [George Q.] Cannon & [Joseph F.] Smith came. no conference. I prayed Pres[ident] Cannon M[outh]. Discussed southern Mission. I not satisfied with Bro[ther] Ben Rich's expl[a]nation in relation to business and finances. Pres[ident]. Cannon feels strong on Subject. I agree with him. It was conceeded that missions were to extravagant and vote was unanimous that elders become selfsustaining near as possible. All the missions should be thoroughly overhauled in the conduct of their business. I am of the opinion that the credit system in Southern states Mission Commisary is altogether wrong as well as some other things. Prince Albert coats is a requisite for every missionary in southern states mission. Too well dressed; singled out for persecution; known everywhere by their dress. Besides our elders are easily persuaded to purchase the "uniform" which is beyond them. they are so well dressed that the people do not open their hearts to give inferior clothes. It was general feeling that elders get work for a short time and earn means instead of burdening their relatives and friends with their calls for money to support them in their missionary fields. (1)


-- Wednesday, Jul 11, 1900
[Apostle John Henry Smith Diary] Salt Lake City

At 9:30 a.m. all of the apostles but Heber J. Grant and John W. Taylor met in council. On motion of Brigham Young it was agreed to recommend to Prest. Lorenzo Snow to allow J. H. Ward $50.00 per month to help him on his paper.

2 p.m. Rudger Clawson and Reed Smoot spoke. Marriner W. Merrill related a dream of Bro. Samuel Roskelly about a large Nephite guarding the entrance to the Logan Temple when a body of U.S. Marshalls were talking of entering there during the Crusade.

Abraham O. Woodruff related a story told by his father of the Prophet Joseph Smith taking a flint arrow spike out of the back bone of a large skeleton found by Zion's Camp on their trip. (2)

Endnotes:
1 - Journal History; Brigham Young Jr., Diary
2 - Jean Bickmore White (editor), Church, State, and Politics: The Diaries of John Henry Smith, Signature Books in association with Smith Research Associates, Salt Lake City, 1990, http://bit.ly/johnhenrysmith

LDS History Chronology: Lorenzo Snow

Mormon History Timeline: the life of Lorenzo Snow
http://lds-church-history.blogspot.com/

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Lorenzo Snow, Friday, Jun 29, 1900

-- Friday, Jun 29, 1900
[Apostle Rudger Clawson Diary] Salt Lake City. Clear and hot. I spent the day in Brigham City, going at 7 a.m. and returning at 7 p.m. While there I took stock at the Brigham City Roller Mill for the 6 months ending June 30th, 1900, and attended to some other matters of business.

8:30 p.m. Accompanied by Lydia, I attended the wedding reception of LeRoi C. Snow, son of Pres. Lorenzo Snow, and a Miss [Maud Mary] Ford, lately from the East, given in the "Beehive House." It is estimated there were 400 guests present. (1)


-- Jul 2, 1900; Monday
Today Presidents [George Q.] Cannon and [Joseph F.] Smith were at the office. President [Lorenzo] Snow took a short ride during the day but remained most of the time in his room.

The sum of $165. was appropriated in favor of the California Mission to pay the expenses of taking care of and shipping the remains of Elder Beecher who died there a short time ago.

The sum of $200. was also appropriated in favor of the Diamondville branch meeting house.

An order of $2,000. was also issued in favor of Heber J. Grant. Just before the late financial crisis in 1893, Brother Grant donated this amount in addition to some $5,000. or more, in favor of the Temple. Brother Grant gave his I.O.U. for this amount to Bishop [William B.] Preston and was credited on temple donation account. He became virtually bankrupt in consequence of the panic, on his representing to President Snow his inability to lift this obligation, and in view of the fact that he had already donated so liberally, President Snow forgave or cancelled the obligation; but as Bishop Preston had given Brother Grant credit for this amount this order is issued in favor of the Bishop's office to square his books. (2)


-- Jul 5, 1900; Thursday
President [Lorenzo] Snow was feeling much better today, he took a ride yesterday and again today, but is still confined to his room most of the time.

At 11 o'clock the brethren met in the Temple. There were present of the First Presidency, Presidents George Q. Cannon and Joseph F. Smith, of the Apostles, Brigham Young [Jr.], Francis M. Lyman, John W. Taylor, Anthon H. Lund, Matthias F. Cowley, Rudger Clawson and Reed Smoot. ...

A long communication was read from President Ben E. Rich of the Southern States mission, in answer to a communication of the First Presidency to him of the 22 ult. The writer rendered a financial account of the mission and explained to the satisfactory of the Council the questions asked him by the Presidency.

Some time was spent in discussing the advisability of continuing the policy of the Southern States mission furnishing its elders suits of clothes, and making it a requirement that they purchase them, and thus having its elders dressed uniformly.

Brother Young felt that the business policy of the Southern States mission was founded on a false basis, for the reason that it was nothing more or less than a credit system, and must eventually bankrupt itself. He said he could not suggest a remedy for it except to cut the credit system down and do business on a cash basis. He did not favor uniformity in dress of our missionaries; and he feared that the commissary department

produced this effect, that missionaries would learn to trust in it instead of the Lord.

Brother Cowley made quite a lengthy talk giving his experience in the Southern States. He was inclined to the belief that if the commissary department were dispensed with it would cost the elders less for their support than at present.

President Cannon felt that something ought to be done in all of our missions to, if possible, lessen the expense of keeping missionaries, as the strain had become so great on their friends at home that many were already feeling the burden that was upon them.

Brother John W. Taylor remarked that he had by way of experiment, instructed the elders in the Colorado mission to work about a month during the busy season of each year and thereby earn something to pay their own expenses; and he had instructed them not to send home for means for their support. This was of doing had made for themselves friends, and got them school houses to preach in. He felt that if the elders would work during the day and preach at night they would do better. Brother Young added, "And escape persecution."

Brother Lyman now remarked that as persecution generally was aroused during the summer season, it would no doubt be a good thing for our elders to work among the people, as suggested by Brother Taylor.

Brother Woodruff related his experience in this line in Germany.

Brother Clawson saw no objection to the commissary department of the Southern States mission inasmuch as it supplied good, respectable clothing for the price which missionaries would have to pay for an inferior suit, but in order to do a safe business it should be run as nearly as possible on a cash basis.

Brother Smoot made quite lengthy remarks in the same line, holding that inasmuch as this commissary department could furnish respectable and fashionable suits for $15., it was an accommodation to the missionaries, and besides, it was a source of revenue to the mission, as the mission made a profit on the goods. The speaker referred to the custom in England, which was the same as the continental missions, that the first thing elders did was to get a suit of broadcloth and a stovepipe hat, when they arrived in the mission. He believed that all missionaries should be well dressed, and especially if he could get a good suit of clothing for the same price as an ordinary business suit. He felt, however, that the business should be run in a cash basis.

President Cannon questioned the wisdom of dressing the Elders uniformly. He said he had no objection to the commissary system of the mission, but felt that if the people would not receive the truth from an elder plainly dressed, they were not worthy of the truth. He thought the matter should be presented to President Snow and requested the brethren to acquaint themselves with the conditions in the Southern States mission in the meantime. It was the sense of the Council that the missionaries should become self sustaining as nearly as possible. ... (2)

Endnotes:
1 - Stan Larson (editor), A Ministry of Meetings: The Apostolic diaries of Rudger Clawson, Signature Books in association with Smith Research Associates, Salt Lake City, 1993, http://bit.ly/rudgerclawson
2 - First Presidency and Quorum of the Twelve minutes

LDS History Chronology: Lorenzo Snow

Mormon History Timeline: the life of Lorenzo Snow
http://lds-church-history.blogspot.com/

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